• Freedman Center

    Support Groups for New Babies, New Moms, New Dads, New Parents. (Photo by Jenny Devereaux, www.jennydev.com)

  • Freedman Center Teens

    Groups for parents of adolescents and teens

  • Freedman Center

    Support Groups for New Babies, New Moms, New Dads, New Parents (Photos by Jenny Devereaux, www.jennydev.com)

  • Freedman Center

    Supporting Adolescents

  • Freedman Center

    Support Groups for New Babies, New Moms, New Dads, New Parents

Freedman Center In the News

Each year, the press has taken an interest in some of the events at The Freedman Center at William James College and seek out members of our community to comment on important child and family development issues. Here are a few examples:


The Lowell Sun
Groton man helps others find the right help
By Hiroko Sato | December 25, 2011

Steve Boczenowski knows referrals to doctors' offices often start in conversations among parents at school-bus stops or on soccer fields.

From orthopedist to dentist, parents ask around to get the names of physicians that may fit their children's needs.

But the search for the right help is a lot more private and lonely process than that for those looking for mental-health professionals, said Boczenowski, who lost his 21-year-old son, Jeffrey, to a drug-overdose suicide in December 2009.

That is why, Boczenowski said, Teenage Anxiety & Depression Solutions (TADS), a local group that he and his wife, Deb, started, decided to bring William James College INTERFACE® Community Resource & Referral helpline to the area.

Read more here


West Roxbury Patch
Cyberbullying and Parenting: Back to the Basics
By Margaret Hannah, MEd | September 12, 2011

As a parent, you might feel ill-equipped to respond to cyberbullying. You're not alone. A 2009 survey indicated that 84% of parents do not know how to respond to cyberbullying. If you didn't grow up in the online world, you may be unfamiliar with certain technologies and "cyberspeak." You may be convinced that you were born a generation too late to relate to current online etiquette or to know what behaviors are appropriate. Even if you are internet savvy, you may be astounded by how easily young children adopt and adapt each new advance in technology.

You may also be dealing with the biggest roadblock to feelings of parental competency: your adolescent. Many teens, as they try to separate themselves from authority figures, make it their mission to keep their online world - with all its positive and frightening attributes - their own. In doing so, they faithfully follow in the footsteps of myriad teens before them who posted DO NOT ENTER signs on their bedroom doors, spent hours whispering to friends on the phone, and wrote their journal entries in code.

That knowledge should help today's parents take heart. Because while bullying has now taken on a new dimension, the behavior itself is ancient. Parents should not feel powerless; instead, you should feel confident about responding in ways that are familiar and in concert with your own well-established parenting values and style.

Read more here


West Roxbury Patch
Part I: Just When You Think You Understand Your Kids. They Change!
By Margaret Hannah, M.Ed. | July 16, 2011

Parenthood can bring joy and sorrow, challenges and successes. It can make one feel proud, tired, delighted, bored, and overwhelmed - sometimes all at once.

It is not uncommon for a parent to neglect his/her own needs while focusing on those of the child. As it has often been said, parenting is the most important, most wonderful, and most difficult job ever.

Most parents are eager to do a good job. But it seems there is always something to learn: a new technique to try, a different struggle to overcome. Just when a parent feels competent and confident about an appropriate parenting style or technique, the child changes.

Confidence and competence may be replaced by feelings of bewilderment and betrayal, as the parent needs to re-think, re-learn, or re-invent his/her approach. How can mothers and fathers learn to enjoy this constantly-evolving parenting puzzle?

Read more here


West Roxbury Patch
Part II: Just When You Think You Understand Your Kids. They Change!
By Margaret Hannah, MEd | July 17, 2011

Most parents are eager to do a good job. But it seems there is always something to learn: a new technique to try, a different struggle to overcome. Just when a parent feels competent and confident about an appropriate parenting style or technique, the child changes.

Confidence and competence may be replaced by feelings of bewilderment and betrayal, as the parent needs to re-think, re-learn, or re-invent his/her approach. How can mothers and fathers learn to enjoy this constantly-evolving parenting puzzle?

It is important to have a plan.

Each new stage of a child's development is accompanied by changes that, though they may challenge parents, are actually positive proclamations: the child is growing! Each stage requires a particular parental approach. Armed with a little knowledge about those stages, parents can nurture the child appropriately, while anticipating and preparing for upcoming changes.

Read more here

Wondering About Mental Health & Wellness?

promo-interface_2