William James College Confronts Dire Need for Those Able to Serve Veterans

William James College Confronts Dire Need for Those Able to Serve Veterans

Understanding Military Culture

“It's important for people to be aware of the unique needs of veterans and their families. Make no assumptions about a person's experience.”

- Captain Jenny D'Olympia, veteran and Clinical Psychology PsyD student

Air Force Captain Jenny D'Olympia, a William James College third-year doctoral student and the mother of children ages eight, three and two, was in service for nine years. She insists, "It' important for people to be aware of the unique needs of veterans and their families. I want to help people who want to help veterans," she says, having already been a mental health counselor for seven years, mostly serving veterans. "I know how hard it can be." D'Olympia is eager to do what she loves, psychological testing and assessment. "I need a break from trauma work," she says. "Maybe I'l be a supervisor or help with training. Those with no exposure to military life have much to learn about that culture," she says. "Having information ahead of time will enable them to build trust with veterans, but they need to learn what questions to ask and what questions not to ask." D'Olympia was deployed twice to Afghanistan where she also spent her honeymoon with her Air Force husband, in separate units. He is still active duty. "Every individual's time in the military is unique," she says, "depending on what they bring to the table. Make no assumptions about a person's experience."

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